Using Google Search Console To Improve Search Results

Using Google Search Console To Improve Search Results

Design is important and we already know that “content is king” when it comes to having a successful Web site, but there’s another factor that can prove hugely important for Web site owners that many people don’t really pay attention to, and that’s search terms. Not keywords, not the words or phrases that you ensure you mention in your articles to make them findable, but the terms that people search for when they find and end up on your site. That’s why Google Search Console is so important.

google search console

Many business owners exhibit a certain level of hubris or blind jargonism when it comes to this topic, assuring anyone who’ll listen that they know exactly how their visitors search for their content or product. A house painting blogger will insist everyone knows what “exterior” means while a jewelry site is confident that the one word “sterling” is sufficient and that no-one ever searches for “sterling silver”.

Google Search Console is actually alot more in-depth than what most people know. Below, I’ll highlight all the great data you can mine out of thsi tool to improve your site right now!

Using Search Console to overcome niche topic jargon

It’s a common mistake because jargon in particular is hugely efficient within an industry, allowing niche publishers to communicate easily and effectively. Anyone who has left their doctor’s office confused about a diagnosis is aware, however, that effective communication with peers and a lay audience are two different things entirely!

using google search console to improve search results

That’s why search engine optimization (SEO) experts talk about doing keyword research. Whether a tool like Google AdWords or an SEO-focused utility like SEMrush, it’s smart to have a good handle on which words in your industry are the most popular.

But you have an extraordinary tool available to you for free that gives you even more interesting data: the words or phrases that people searched for, had your page show up in the search results, and click on your page to visit. It’s one of many reasons to visit and learn to use Google Search Console (formerly known as Webmaster Tools).

We’ve talked about how to effectively use keyword research to write better content before, see here.

A word of wisdom on using Google Search Console

Even before we look at the search and search terms, there’s a much more important reason to work with Google Search Console: It’s the only way that Google Search and its spider Googlebot can communicate with you, the site owner. If you get penalized for “thin content” or have errors in your AMP implementation, for example, it’s through GSC that you’ll learn about it, as shown in Figure One.

search results with search console
figure 1

Notice on the left side the main categories: Messages, Search Appearance, Search Traffic, Google Index, Crawl and Security Issues. Got hacked and don’t know about it?

Security Issues will tell you what’s going on and make it much easier to fix (and tell Google when you have fixed it all up). There’s much to explore, including an entire section on Google’s latest push, Accelerated Mobile Pages, but suffice to say, it’s all worth exploring.

This was a recent hot topic. The popular website Natural News was de-indexed in Google for a violation in webmaster guidelines. They claimed Google gave them no warning, then Google issued a statement showing that they had been previously notified in their Google Search Console.

Improving and examining search results

Go into the Search Traffic > Search Analytics area and you’ll get some really interesting information about words and phrases people are entering on Google that gets them to your site. On my site, the most popular article in the last 28 days has been about deleting a Netflix account profile. The searches that have led people to that page include “how to delete a netflix profile”, “how to delete netflix profile” and “how to delete a profile on netflix”. Combined, they brought almost 800 visitors to my site. Who knew so many people wanted to delete their Netflix profile? 🙂

But the information is way more interesting than just that, as shown in Figure Two.

search console reporting tools
figure 2

You can see that on average, a user search for deleting a Netflix profile had my page in position #4 and that 11.91% of the people who saw that page clicked on it. In total, 2351 searches were done on Google in the last 28 days where my page was shown, and it garnered me 280 total clicks.

Now imagine having that level of data for each of the top ten searches on Google that sent people to your site. What made those pages work so well for you? What caused other pages to not do as well? All that sort of information can be gleaned from Google Search Console. And a lot more too.

This is a great part II to the type of research you should be doing on the front end of content development. This is really how you break down how your content is being accessed by users!

Get started with Search Console in more depth

So what are you waiting for? Get into Google Search Console right now and start learning so much more about your audience and how they find you. And while you’re there, do check for manual actions, security issues and anything else untoward that’s flagged.

Any other great tips for Search Console? Post them below. Have additional questions? I’m all ears.

Author: Dave Taylor

Dave Taylor has been involved with the Internet since it was known as the ARPAnet and has had to redesign his sites many, many times to keep up with the most modern technologies. You can check out his site http://www.AskDaveTaylor.com/ or find him on social media as @DaveTaylor

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